Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Financial Aid for Deafness and Hearing Loss

Several sources of legit money to help with hearing loss exist, mostly with lower cost or free hearing aids and some resources for cochlear implants.  However, some educational money exists as well.

For hearing aids, Miracle Ear has no-cost hearing aids for low income children who are 16 or younger.  The Alliance for Accessible Hearing Care has low-cost hearing aids for qualified applicants, adult or children.  The Starkey Hearing Foundation's So the World May Hear program donates recycled hearing aids to needy applicants. 

In the area of cochlear implants, a couple of organizations may help.  The Gift of Hearing Foundation does provide aid, but does NOT take applications directly from patients--only referrals from implant providers.  Contact your implant providers for a referral.  The Colorado Neurological Institute provides financial assistance for cochlear implants and also the Baha device.  For information on other resources, see this article by Cochlear Ltd.--it's a few years old, but the links still hold up.

There are some other listings of financial aid information, including this one from Gallaudet College and the Hearing Loss Association.

Finally, there's some help in getting private education for children with moderate to profound hearing loss in the K-12 grade level and pre-school educational intervention for children from the Alexander Graham Bell Foundation.

2 comments:

mertin fordin said...

We have recently moved to Atlanta from up north and my husband's hearing aids stopped working. Any suggestions for where we can get them fixed or replaced at an affordable price?

hearing aids atlanta

Linda Koss said...

There's a couple of places you can try: The Georgia Lions Lighthouse Foundation (404) 325-3630 will provide reduced-cost hearing aids, but you need to get an exam from one of their providers, have no insurance and meet their income guidelines. You may also want to try the Auditory Verbal Center (404) 633-8911 that provides hearing aids on a sliding scale.